Friday, July 3, 2009

Podcast: Crypto-Gram 15 Oct 2006 Facebook can change the rules whenever it wants. Its Privacy Policy is 2,800 words long, and ends with a notice that

Podcast: Crypto-Gram 15 Oct 2006 Facebook can change the rules whenever it wants. Its Privacy Policy is 2,800 words long, and ends with a notice that it can change at any time.

from the October 15, 2006 Crypto-Gram Newsletter
by Bruce Schneier

* Renew Your Passport Now!
Passports will soon be equipped with RFID chips. And you don't want one of these chips in your passport.

One researcher found a vulnerability in which he could identify individual chips via unique characteristics of the radio transmissions. Another successfully cloned a chip. Considering the research was done only 2 weeks and the security of your passport has to be strong enough to last 10 years.

* Expensive Cameras in Checked Luggage

A safe wayt to check expensive camera equipment on airplanes:

Using a starter pistols (little guns that fire blanks at track and swim meets, are considered weapons...and do NOT have to be registered in any state in the US).

Upon check-in is tell the airline ticket agent that I have a weapon to declare...I'm given a little card to sign, the card is put in the case, the case is given to a TSA official who takes my key and locks the case, and gives my key back to me.

"That's the procedure. The case is extra-tracked...TSA does not want to lose a weapons case. This reduces the chance of the case being lost to virtually zero.

* Facebook and Data Control

Facebook introduced a new feature called "News Feeds" that shows an aggregation of everything members do on the site: added and deleted friends, a change in relationship status, a new favorite song, a new interest, etc. Instead of a member's friends having to go to his page to view any changes, these changes are all presented to them automatically - FB user were outrage with this sudden change or privacy rule.

Facebook can change the rules whenever it wants. Its Privacy Policy is 2,800 words long, and ends with a notice that it can change at any time.


People believe they own their data, even though the user agreement might technically give companies the right to sell the data, change the access rules to that data, or otherwise own that data, we -- the users -- believe otherwise.

* Indexes to NSA Publications Declassified and Online

Michael Ravnitzky submitted a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request to the National Security Agency for a copy of the index to their historical reports at the Center for Cryptologic History and the index to certain journals. It took more than three years for them to process and declassify

* Screaming Cell Phones

Remotely erasing data on stolen cell phones is a good idea regardless, though. And since cell phones are far more often lost than stolen, how about the phone calmly announcing that it is lost and it would like to be returned to its own

* FairUse4WM News

M$ might use lawsuit as fishing expedition to get identity information, which can then be used to either bring more targeted lawsuits, or to cause other trouble...


length: 36:49m
PS: this is my cheat sheet of Bruce Schneier's Podcast:
http://www.schneier.com/crypto-gram-0610.html

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